The staple singers - the ghetto / got to be some changes made


The Andrews Sisters versatile sound and range in genres explains their longevity in the music industry and popularity with people all over the world. They had major hits in nearly all types of music ranging from swing to country-western. This tremendous popularity did not stop in the music business. The trio could also be found performing in radio series, commercials, Hollywood movies and on Broadway.

The Staples move to Epic saw a run of albums, including the live in-church Freedom Highway album produced by Billy Sherrill ; the title track of which was a civil rights movement protest song penned by Pop Staples. It was on Epic that the Staple Singers developed a style more accessible to mainstream audiences, with "Why (Am I Treated So Bad)" and " For What It's Worth " ( Stephen Stills ) in 1967. In 1968, the Staple Singers signed to Stax Records and released two albums with Steve Cropper — Soul Folk in Action and We'll Get Over , Pervis returning for them. [5] After Cropper left Stax, Al Bell produced their recordings, conducting the rhythm sessions at the famed Muscle Shoals Sound Studio and cutting the overdubs himself at Memphis's Ardent Studios , [6] moving in a more funk and soul direction.


The Staple Singers - The Ghetto / Got To Be Some Changes MadeThe Staple Singers - The Ghetto / Got To Be Some Changes MadeThe Staple Singers - The Ghetto / Got To Be Some Changes MadeThe Staple Singers - The Ghetto / Got To Be Some Changes Made

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